Wednesday, April 1, 2009

I have a question for you...

Ireland Winding Road
I'd just like to get feel of what readers generally feel about this. I think it's a hard question.

What would you choose to take on a trip overseas?

A. point-and-shoot camera of your choice

B. DLSR that the pros use with an array of lenses

There are good reasons for either answer. I'm curious what you'll say. Answer in the comments and let everyone know why.

15 comments:

BlueTara said...

A really good point & shoot. I took a DSLR to Ireland w/all the lens, etc. but by the end of the day I was so tired of lugging around that big camera that I was longing for a good sub-compact. Plus I wanted to blend in more than I could w/a huge camera around my tourist neck.

Best of both worlds I would take both & switch them out.

ellen said...

I always take my DSLR when I travel. Think of the quality of photos you want to have. :)

cmanon said...

I took my DSLR with a couple of lenses (17-40 and 70-200) and no regrets.

Shane D. said...

A really good point and shoot. For example Panasonic Lumix DMC-T5Z. because its so convenient. You can run a 16 GB sdhc card for HD (720 only) video. 10.7 mp, 28 - 280mm iso 100 - 6400

Check out the review;
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonictz5/

unless your going with the intention of bringing home professional photos. it fits in your pocket! and you get video of the trip

oscar manuel said...

Upon which I do not have a DSRL hand, neither a point-and-shoot, I prefer the latter for convenience, but if I had used the the DSLR, but I think often comes out more comfortable and convenient use point-and-shoot
Simple comment from a novice to the objectives.

Greetings, I like your blog.

Coplan said...

Definately a DSLR. But I would be selective about the lenses. I think that if you only have one or two lenses, you easily cut on weight, but you also set yourself up for a challenge (a fun one). When traveling, it's probably not a good idea to keep too many lenses on hand. You'll miss the shot trying to find the lens you want.

Zooms are great for traveling, but I would also want a fast prime like a 35mm or a 50mm or even a 10.5 fisheye for indoor work.

Candice said...

B. because I still want one, and even with all of your training, I think that I might possibly take better pictures...maybe?

Dan said...

@BlueTara, We did that very same thing on our trip to Ireland. The DSLR became cumbersome, but worth it. My wife is the pro photographer in the family. I used my point-and-shoot for self portraits, video and things I found interesting.

@Candice, Back in college I wanted a guitar but I didn't really play. I told myself that I would ask for one for Christmas, but only if I could learn to play and sing five songs with my roommate's guitar. Mission accomplished. Anyway, making myself "earn" the guitar proved that I would actually play it (so my "santa" would be more inclined to oblige my wishes) and when I got it, I was more excited and it made for a great Winter break. Anyway, try the same thing with your DSLR. (maybe frame five of your own photos in your home to earn the DSLR) And let us know how it goes.

Carebear said...

A point and shoot. Maybe because I don't have a dSLR so I don't know exactly what I'm missing. I wouldn't even take my bulky P&S Sony DSC-H50. I'd take something small and pocket sized, like a coolpix for convenience sake. If I wanted pro shots of something, I'd buy a postcard, LOL! Really though, I traveled Europe as a college student a few years back, and only had one pack. Have to travel light in that case...

2Things@Once said...

Both! A timely question for me, since I'm two weeks away from vacation and planning to take two cameras with me. I hope to do the majority of my shooting with my Nikon DSLR. I'm bringing the G9 for pocket shots and video.

Dan said...

@Carebear, good idea about buying a postcard. They're always awesome photos.

@2Things@Once, congratulations on your trip, show us the photos when you get back! I think the G9 is probably one of the best all around cameras, an excellent point-and-shoot.

Mark said...

It's really much more a question of technique than quality. Fine PNS cameras are capable of producing outstanding files (I shoot advertising images for Nikon and can attest to that having seen my 6MP captures 3x5' at trade shows. The deal is, it's easier to shoot a DSLR because of their responsiveness, and also easier to use the optical viewfinder in sunlight. Learn to actually use all the controls and features on today's PNS cameras and you can make incredible images with them. Especially amazing for macro work. The trick is using them creatively... otherwise the type of image you get is just what most people use them for... snapshots.

Carrie said...

I LOVE this picture! I'd go for a smaller camera.

Neha said...

Point and shoot. Mostly because I'm not comfortable with a DSLR, but also because I like the ability to throw it in my pocket and always have it with me without it weighing me down.

Rafael Amorim said...

I take, always, my Canon S5 IS... it looks like an Point-and-shot, and has quite good specs and configs as an DSLR... it is portable since it fits on my small hand bag and make great shots!
follow me at my Deviantart photo gallery: MondfinsternisBR (search me!)
P.S.: I like your blog very much!
Greetings from Brazil!